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Faculty Searches Announced

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Two new faculty openings have been announced by Bethany Seminary: a full-time position in Brethren studies and a part-time position in reconciliation studies. Both will begin on or before July 1, 2013, and searches for applicants are underway.

The creation of these positions has come about through a curriculum review process that has its roots in the Seminary’s five-year strategic plan. Among the goals for the review are to develop new curriculum offerings around conflict transformation and around the missional church, evangelism, and social justice. These efforts are also directly supported by resources generated through the Seminary’s current Reimagining Ministries campaign.

Steve Schweitzer, academic dean, describes the relationship of these educational goals to the Anabaptist-Pietist heritage. “Bethany's new faculty position in reconciliation studies and the expansion of our Brethren studies position grow out of our commitment to addressing needs and realities of our present culture and congregations,” he says. “As the world is becoming more polarized and conflict continues to damage us individually and corporately, our leaders must be prepared to work productively and positively. By adding courses in Brethren studies, we will be able to stretch our students in thinking what it means to be living out our Brethren heritage and values in today's society in the United States and globally. Brethren studies is not only about the past—it is about the future.”

“I am excited that Bethany's new curriculum, scheduled to begin fall 2013, will provide students with these opportunities to deepen and broaden their perspectives and skills as they move out as strong leaders in the church and world.”

For full position descriptions and application requirements, click on the following links:

Brethren Studies Position

Reconciliation Studies Position

Matt Boersma
Master of Arts

MattMy thesis began its journey while learning Hebrew at the University of Notre Dame, back when I was an employee in the Information Technology department. Among the many Hebrew texts read, it was the Song of Songs in particular that caught my attention. I knew that historically it had been interpreted as an allegorical text exploring God's love of Israel (or the church), but I had not encountered the deeply sensual nature of the images and the erotic tone of the text. Reading through the book, the unabashed sexuality of the words struck me as completely different than how the rest of the Bible treats sex. During the previous semester we had read selections of Ezekiel, where sex and female desire is cast as idolatrous and evil. In the Song, it is unashamed and extolled.