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Susquehanna Valley Ministry Center Courses

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Cup and Bread Open Books
These courses are offered by Bethany and hosted by the
Susquehanna Valley Ministry Center, Elizabethtown, Pennsylvania.

To receive graduate credit, students must be enrolled at Bethany.

FALL 2015


Brethren Beliefs and Practices
Taught by Denise Kettering-Lane at Elizabethtown College

September 11-12, October 2-3, November 5-6
Fridays 2:00-10:00 p.m. and Saturdays 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.

This course explores the range of beliefs and practices vital to the Church of the Brethren and related denominations across three centuries, and seeks to understand how beliefs and practices inform one another. It aims to prepare students to explain the distinctive Brethren witness to today’s congregations and to be able to address the present postmodern context grounded in knowledge of the tradition.
**Please be aware that this is a theology course and does not fulfill ordination requirements for a course dedicated to Church of the Brethren history or polity.


New Testament Foundation of Ministry
Taught by Dan Ulrich at Juniata College

September 11-12, October 2-3, November 5-6
Fridays 2:00-10:00 p.m. and Saturdays 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.

This seminar invites students to examine and develop their theology of ministry in light of some of the ways ministry is understood in the New Testament. While exploring a range of New Testament texts, students will practice interpretive methods that are both enlightening and feasible in the context of a busy ministry setting.

Courses can be taken for 3.0 graduate credits or audited for 3.0 CEUs.


Course listings are subject to change.  Check the current course schedule on the Seminary Academic Services website for possible additional courses or corrections.


Katie Shaw Thompson
Master of Divinity

BethanyI have to admit I had no idea how much my cross-cultural trip to Marburg, Germany, would broaden my perspective. By immersing myself in German culture, I learned more about hospitality, theology, global politics, my neighbor, and myself than I thought possible in two weeks.

I was overwhelmed by the hospitality shown to us by the parish church and our host families. I will forever be grateful for those conversations across the table, across cultural differences, and across language barriers about the things that matter deeply to us all.