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Bethany Theological Seminary's Academic Catalog

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Here is Bethany Seminary's official 2014-2015 catalog. You may download it (right-click and save) or simply click to view it directly from this page.

2014-2015 Bethany Theological Seminary Catalog 2013-14 Catalog
(rev.1, 3.9 Mb -- pdf format*)

 

If you find the pdf too large to conveniently download, please contact admissions@bethanyseminary.edu, and we will be glad to send a copy of our catalog on CD to you by mail. 

 


Note: The content of this publication is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be used as a contract between Bethany Theological Seminary and any other party. Bethany Theological Seminary reserves the right to change, eliminate,and add to rules, regulations, policies, fees and other charges, courses of study, and academic requirements. Whenever it does so, the Seminary will give as much advanced notice as it considers feasible or appropriate, but it reserves the right in all cases to do so without notice.

 

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Matt Boersma
Master of Arts

MattMy thesis began its journey while learning Hebrew at the University of Notre Dame, back when I was an employee in the Information Technology department. Among the many Hebrew texts read, it was the Song of Songs in particular that caught my attention. I knew that historically it had been interpreted as an allegorical text exploring God's love of Israel (or the church), but I had not encountered the deeply sensual nature of the images and the erotic tone of the text. Reading through the book, the unabashed sexuality of the words struck me as completely different than how the rest of the Bible treats sex. During the previous semester we had read selections of Ezekiel, where sex and female desire is cast as idolatrous and evil. In the Song, it is unashamed and extolled.