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Master of Divinity

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Bethany's Master of Divinity (MDiv) program is a professional degree program designed to prepare persons for church-related ministries requiring ordination. This includes:

  • Pastoral Ministry;
  • Evangelists and church planters;
  • Chaplaincy programs in many settings;
  • Ecclesiastical ministries to many people; and
  • Many other vocations that one views as ministry.

The program combines hands-on ministry experience with classroom learning. The degree requires twenty-seven courses totaling eighty-one credit hours, covering four primary disciplines (Bible, Theology and History, Ministry, and Integrative) and the Ministry Formation sequence.

At the heart of the MDiv Program is Ministry Formation, a process of learning ministry by doing and reflecting upon ministry, to which the whole curricular program contributes. Ministry Formation features two supervised ministry experiences in two different ministry settings:

  • A nine-month part-time ministry placement during the second (middler) year;
  • A unit of Clinical Pastoral Education, a full-time intern year, or a prior, extended, or summer placement.  

You may obtain your Master of Divinity degree through traditional on-campus studies, or the MDiv Connections track of our highly-acclaimed and fully accredited distance education program.

 


For more information about a Master of Divinity at Bethany, refer to the Bethany Catalog, or contact:  Apply Now!
                  
                         admissions@bethanyseminary.edu      800-287-8822

Steven SchweitzerSteven Schweitzer, Academic Dean and Associate Professor
     deansoffice@bethanyseminary.edu     765-983-1815

 

Tara Hornbacker

Tara Hornbacker, Professor of Ministry Formation
     hornbata@bethanyseminary.edu     765-983-1817

 

Matt Boersma
Master of Arts

MattMy thesis began its journey while learning Hebrew at the University of Notre Dame, back when I was an employee in the Information Technology department. Among the many Hebrew texts read, it was the Song of Songs in particular that caught my attention. I knew that historically it had been interpreted as an allegorical text exploring God's love of Israel (or the church), but I had not encountered the deeply sensual nature of the images and the erotic tone of the text. Reading through the book, the unabashed sexuality of the words struck me as completely different than how the rest of the Bible treats sex. During the previous semester we had read selections of Ezekiel, where sex and female desire is cast as idolatrous and evil. In the Song, it is unashamed and extolled.