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Bethany Theological Seminary's Logo

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Bethany's LogoBethany Theological Seminary's evocative logo has features that are clear and confessional and others less tangible, inviting imagination and wonder. It serves as an invitation to join our community, which features both of those dimensions.

Consistent with Bethany's mission to educate witnesses to the Gospel of Jesus Christ, the cross is prominent at the center, arising from baptismal waters and rehearsed in the practice of foot washing, both important worship practices in the Church of the Brethren. The bottom perimeter of the symbol suggests a circle, not closed but open to Light from above and new voices from beyond. It represents a symbol of community and is expressive of Bethany's educational process, which grounds theological education in spiritual formation with the life and ministry of communities of faith. At the bottom of the waters is a fish, the symbol early Christians used to express their commitment to Jesus Christ, the son of God. Atop the waters is a form which lends itself to several symbolic possibilities. As a book, it denotes both Bethany's biblical foundation and striving for academic excellence. As a dove, the lines lift up both the dove of divine presence at baptism and the dove of peace, representing one of the living testimonies of the Church of the Brethren.

Creation of the new logo was a part of the Seminary's institutional identity project. The development process, under the direction of Hafenbrack Marketing of Dayton, Ohio, took several months and involved input from representatives of all of Bethany's constituencies.

Monica Rice
Master of Arts

MonicaIt is no small task to choose a topic that will hold enough interest to devote countless hours and hundreds of pages of reading and writing. I have found that topic in researching the tradition of the prayer covering in the Church of the Brethren. This practice piqued my curiosity because of the lack of available writing and discussion about it. For instance, the last time that Annual Meeting/Conference addressed the covering was 1925!